Cardiovascular Event Risk in Dialysis Patients Higher Among Women

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In the first year after starting dialysis, women have 16% increased odds of major adverse cardiovascular events compared with men.
In the first year after starting dialysis, women have 16% increased odds of major adverse cardiovascular events compared with men.
The following article is part of conference coverage from Kidney Week 2018 in San Diego hosted by the American Society of Nephrology. Renal & Urology News staff will be reporting live on medical studies conducted by nephrologists and other specialists who are tops in their field in acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, dialysis, transplantation, and more. Check back for the latest news from Kidney Week 2018.

SAN DIEGO—Women are more likely than men in the first year after starting dialysis to be hospitalized for major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), investigators reported at the American Society of Nephrology's Kidney Week 2018 conference.

In a study of 96,729 patients who initiated dialysis from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2008, Silvi Shah, MD, and colleagues at the University of Cincinnati in Ohio found that, compared with men, women had a significantly higher frequency of acute hospitalizations for MACE (41.8% vs 38.3), congestive heart failure (CHF, 36.7% vs 33.1%), and stroke (5.8% vs 4.5%). Men and women had similar rates of unstable angina and acute myocardial infarction.

In adjusted analyses, women had significant 16%, 17%, and 28% increased adjusted odds of acute hospitalization with MACE, CHF, and stroke, respectively, compared with men in the first year after starting dialysis.

Dr Shah's team analyzed data from the US Renal Data System and linked Medicare claims data. Women made up 45.2% of the study population, which had a mean age of 70 years. The all-cause 1-year mortality rate was 43.3%.

“Cardiovascular disease remains the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease,” Dr Shah told Renal & Urology News. “Our study finding indicates significant sex disparities in cardiovascular health among patients on dialysis. Further studies are needed to better understand this sex disparity and may lead to specific interventions to reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in women on dialysis.”


Visit Renal & Urology News' conference section for continuous coverage from Kidney Week 2018.

Reference

Shah S, Christianson A, Meganathan K, et al. Sex disparities in cardiovascular events in incidence dialysis patients. Presented at the American Society of Nephrology's Kidney Week 2018 conference in San Diego, Oct. 23-28. Abstract TH-PO462.

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