Possible Overactive Bladder Biomarkers Identified in Men

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Study suggests male OAB could be associated with abnormalities in metabolic pathways of fatty acids and bile acids.
Study suggests male OAB could be associated with abnormalities in metabolic pathways of fatty acids and bile acids.

PHILADELPHIA—Male overactive bladder (OAB) may be associated with abnormalities in metabolic pathways of fatty acids and bile acids, new study findings presented at the International Continence Society's 2018 annual meeting suggest.

In study compared men with and without OAB, metabolomics analysis identified 79 metabolites from plasma, of which 6 were more common among men with OAB, Takahiko Mitsui, MD, PhD, and collaborators at the University of Yamanashi, Kōfu, Japan, reported. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that increases in erucic acid (22:1), palmitoleic acid, and cis-11 eicosenoic acid and a decrease in cholic acid were significantly associated with OAB.

Each 1-unit increase in erucic acid (22:1), palmitoleic acid, and cis-11 eicosenoic acid was associated with a 1.5-, 4.1, and 4363-fold increased odds of OAB, respectively. Each 1-unit decrease in cholic acid was associated with a 1% increased odds of OAB.

Male OAB could occur through abnormal metabolism of fatty acids and bile acids, which could be associated with metabolic syndrome, according to Dr Mitsui, who presented study findings. Controlling metabolism of fatty acids and bile acids in plasma could be an attractive therapeutic target for OAB.

The study included 47 men, 26 with OAB and 21 without. Patients had a mean age of 71.5 years. All completed 24-hour bladder diaries for assessment of micturition parameters. The OAB group had significantly higher nocturnal urine volume (666 vs 482 mL), 24-hour micturition frequency (11.2 vs 6.7), nocturnal micturition frequency (2.2 vs 0.7), and nocturnal index (2.3 vs 1.3) and significantly lower maximum voided volume (301 vs 370 mL) than the non-OAB group.

Reference

Mitsui T, Kira S, Ihara T, et al. Metabolism of fatty acids and bile acids in plasma are associated with overactive bladder: Metabolomics analysis for possible biomarkers and potential targets for new treatments. Data presented at the International Continence Society's 2018 annual meeting in Philadelphia, August 28–31. Abstract 267.

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