Worse Nocturia Found in Men Taking Multiple BP Drugs

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Taking 2 or more drugs for hypertension is associated with a significantly higher number of nocturnal voids and higher nocturnal polyuria index, study finds.
Taking 2 or more drugs for hypertension is associated with a significantly higher number of nocturnal voids and higher nocturnal polyuria index, study finds.

PHILADELPHIA—Combination drug therapy for hypertension is associated with worse nocturia and nocturnal polyuria than untreated hypertension or single-drug therapy, investigators reported at the International Continence Society's 2018 annual meeting.

In a study of 184 voiding diaries completed by 184 men receiving care at a Veterans Affairs-based urology clinic, men who took multiple blood pressure (BP) drugs had significantly more nocturnal voids than men taking a single BP drug and those with untreated hypertension (median 3.0 vs. 2.5 and 2.5, respectively), a team led by Jeffrey Weiss, MD, of SUNY Downstate College of Medicine in Brooklyn, New York, reported in a poster presentation.

Men taking multiple BP drugs also had a significantly higher nocturnal polyuria index (47% vs 40% and 38%, respectively) and a significantly higher nocturnal bladder capacity index (1.53 vs 1.10 and 1.23, respectively).

“Patients requiring multiple antihypertensive drugs are likely to have more severe and long-lasting hypertension, with impairment of both nocturnal dipping of blood pressure and renal tubular sodium and water transplant,” the authors concluded.

These abnormalities are thought to have a role in driving nocturnal polyuria, according to the investigators.

Reference

Epstein M, Monaghan T, Victor R, Weiss J. Relationship of nocturnal polyuria and combination anti-hypertensive drug therapy. Data presented at the International Continence Society's 2018 annual meeting in Philadelphia, August 28–31. Abstract 107.

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