(HealthDay News) — Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) of observed-to-expected deaths are increased for patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and are especially high for Asians and Hispanic/Latinos, according to research published in the the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Milena A. Gianfrancesco, PhD, from the University of California in San Francisco, and colleagues examined the risk for SLE and population-based estimates of mortality by race and ethnicity using data from 812 patients in the California Lupus Surveillance Project (CLSP) during 2007 to 2009, who were matched to the 2007 to 2017 National Death Index.

The researchers found that 16.6% of the patients from the CLSP had died by 2017, including 14.4, 25, 15.3, and 15.5% of patients of White, Black, Asian, and Hispanic/Latino race/ethnicity, respectively. For each racial/ethnic group, the corresponding SMRs of observed-to-expected deaths among persons with SLE were 2.3, 2.0, 3.8, and 3.9. SMRs were especially higher among Asian and Hispanic/Latina women with SLE (4.1 and 5.8, respectively).


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“Mortality among persons with SLE is high among all racial and ethnic groups but is especially pronounced in Asian and Hispanic/Latino populations,” the authors write.

Reference

Gianfrancesco MA, Dall’Era M, Murphy LB, et al. Mortality Among Minority Populations with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Including Asian and Hispanic/Latino Persons — California, 2007–2017
Weekly / February 19, 2021 / 70(7);236–239.