HealthDay News — For children with end-stage renal disease starting renal replacement therapy (RRT) there is racial disparity in the risk of death, according to a study published online in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Elaine Ku, MD, from the University of California, San Francisco, and colleagues compared the mortality risk among a cohort of non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white children (12,123 children) who started RRT from 1995 to 2011. The children were followed through 2012. About 25 and 26% of the children were non-Hispanic black and of Hispanic ethnicity, respectively.

The researchers found that during a median follow-up of 7.1 years, 1600 children died. The risk of death was 36% higher for non-Hispanic black children (95% CI, 1.21 to 1.52) and 34% lower for Hispanic children (95% CI, 0.57 to 0.77), compared with non-Hispanic white children. The higher risk of death in non-Hispanic black children was attenuated after adjustment for transplant as a time-dependent covariate (hazard ratio, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.88 to 1.12); the lower risk persisted in Hispanic children (hazard ratio, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.51 to 0.68).

“Parity in access to transplantation in children, and improvements in strategies to prolong graft survival, could substantially reduce disparities in mortality risk of non-Hispanic black children treated with RRT,” the authors write.

Related Articles

Reference

  1. Ku E, McCulloch CE, Grimes BA, Johansen KL. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Survival of Children with ESRD.  J Am Soc Nephrol. 2016 Dec 29. doi: 10.1681/ASN.2016060706.