Onset of type 1 diabetes prior to 14 years of age is an independent risk factor for kidney disease, investigators reported at the American Diabetes Association 79th Scientific Sessions in San Francisco.

In a single-center study of 340 patients with type 1 diabetes, those who experienced diabetes onset at ages 1 to 13 years had significant 2.3- and 3.6-fold increased risks of kidney disease compared with those who had diabetes onset at ages 14 to 23 years and 24 to 40 years, respectively, on multivariable analysis, according to Charlyne Carpentier, MD, of Angers University Hospital in Angers, France, and colleagues. The investigators referred to these 3 age groups as T1, T2, and T3, respectively.

The primary end point of the study was the first occurrence of macroalbuminuria (greater than 300 mg albumin/g creatinine), doubling of serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) below 60 mL/min/1.73 m2, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), or all-cause mortality.

Of 114 patients in the T1 group, macroalbuminuria developed in 11 (9.6%), doubling of serum creatinine occurred in 5 (4.4%), an eGFR below 60 developed in 14 (12.3%), ESRD occurred in 8 (7%), and 14 (12.3%) died. Of 119 T2 patients, macroalbuminuria developed in 8 (6.7%), doubling of serum creatinine occurred in 1 (0.8%), an eGFR below 60 occurred in 7 (5.9%), ESRD developed in 4 (3.3%), and 15 (12.6%) died. Of 114 patients in the T3 group, macroalbuminuria developed in 3 (2.8%), doubling of serum creatinine occurred in 1 (0.93%), an eGFR below 60 developed in 4 (3.7%), and 31 (29%) died. ESRD did not develop in any patient.

Reference

Carpentier C, Dubois S, Abouleka Y, et al. Age at diabetes onset and risk for diabetic kidney disease. Presented at the American Diabetes Association’s 79th Scientific Sessions in San Francisco, June 7-11. Poster 550-P.

https://ada.apprisor.org/epsAbstractADA.cfm?id=18