The following article features coverage from the National Kidney Foundation’s 2019 Spring Clinical Meetings. Click here to read more of Renal & Urology News’ conference coverage.

Investigators who studied a national sample of patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) found that computed tomography (CT) was the most common imaging modality.

Nearly half of patients received at least 1 abdominal CT scan over 2 years, Myrlene Sanon, MPH, of Otsuka Pharmaceutical Development & Commercialization, Inc., of Princeton, New Jersey, and colleagues reported in a poster presentation.

Sanon’s team used the IBM MarketScan Commercial and Medicare Supplemental databases to identify patients with ADPKD. A total of 4637 patients with a mean age of 51.2 years met study enrollment criteria. The mean follow-up time was 21.29 months. During the observation period, 46.5% of patients had CT scans, 25.06% had ultrasound examinations, and 9.79% underwent magnetic resonance imaging, according to the investigators.

Of the 37.8% of patients who had information on chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage, the frequency of CT imaging was higher among those with later stage (31%, 37%, 42%, 51%, and 69% of those with stage 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 CKD, respectively.

Overall, 12.9% of patients had a scan during an emergency department (ED) visit leading to hospitalization and 28% had a scan during an ED visit without subsequent hospital admission. In addition, results showed that without a prior ED visit, 30.7% of patients had a scan during inpatient hospitalization and 51% had scans as outpatients.

Read more of Renal & Urology News’ coverage of NKF’s 2019 Spring Clinical Meetings by visiting the conference page.

Reference

Sanon M, Stellhorn R, Pao C, Seliger S. Utilization of radiographic imaging in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Poster presented at the National Kidney Foundation’s 2019 Spring Clinical Meetings in Boston, May 8-12. Poster 366.