When Kidney Week, the world’s premier nephrology meeting, convenes in Washington, DC, for its 2019 conference from November 5-10 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center, it will include new early programs, approximately 4000 abstracts, and a new endowed lectureship, according to the website of the American Society of Nephrology (ASN), the meeting’s sponsor. Kidney Week 2019 is expected to draw some 13,000 nephrologists and other kidney care professionals from around the globe.

Additions to the early programs, which run from November 5-6, include:

  • Advances in Research Conference: Machine Learning and Kidney Diseases
  • Diabetic Kidney Disease: Translating Pathogenic Mechanisms into Therapies
  • Evolving Concepts in Hypertension: Mechanisms, Management, and Future Directions
  • Onco-Nephrology: Cancer, Chemotherapy, and the Kidneys

The meeting’s co-program director Mitchell H. Rosner, MD, the Henry B. Mulholland Professor of Medicine and Chair of the Department of Medicine at the University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville, pointed to some of the Kidney Week 2019 highlights, including an early program session on machine learning and kidney disease that addresses, among other aspects, the potential impact on the understanding of, and/or approach to, kidney disease care, the ability to harness “big data” to predict patient outcomes and allow for personalized approach to treatment, and more effective strategies to refer patients for clinical trials.

Other highlights include sessions on innovations for dialysis delivery, the latest developments in hypertension, new treatments for diabetes and kidneys, major clinical trials for diabetic kidney disease, reimbursement for nephrology care, and high impact clinical trials.

Compared with last year, Dr Rosner said, the studies being presented this year reveal a greater interest in clinical trials of new therapies for diabetic kidney disease and research into glomerular disease that potentially could lead to more targeted therapies based on greater understanding of the pathways involved in disease progression. A third area of enhanced interest this year is hypoxia-inducible factor and ways to activate it for the treatment of renal anemia.

Two new categories of abstracts and oral presentations are being introduced this year: Onco-Nephrology (130 abstracts) and Women’s Health and Kidney Diseases (11 abstracts).

“Those abstracts previously were just getting lost in other categories, and now there were enough of those abstracts really to justify their being separate categories,” Dr Rosner told Renal & Urology News.

Here is a sampling of study titles from the Onco-Nephrology category:

  • Multicenter Study of Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor-Associated AKI
  • Predictors of AKI in Patients Undergoing CAR T-Cell Therapy.
  • Incidence of hypertension and hypothyroidism in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma treated with first-line combination therapy with checkpoint inhibitors.

The Women’s Health and Kidney Diseases category will include such topics as:

  • Hypokalemic periodic paralysis and hypertension in pregnancy: A diagnostic challenge.
  • In vitro fertilization (IVF): Early-onset preeclampsia before 16 weeks’ gestation
  • Successful pregnancies during ongoing complement blockade in two patients with complement mediated thrombotic microangiopathy.

Also at Kidney Week 2019, Bertram L. Kasiske, MD, Director of Nephrology at Hennepin Healthcare in Minneapolis, Minnesota, will deliver the inaugural lecture of the Burton D. Rose, MD, Endowed Lectureship. Dr Kasiske is the US Principal Investigator for National Institutes of Health grants to study long-term effects of kidney donation and cardiovascular disease in kidney transplant recipients. He is scheduled to give his talk, titled, “Educating Patients and Practitioners About the Benefit of Transplantation,” during the session “Let’s Get You That Kidney Transplant” on November 8, 10:30 AM to 12:30 PM.