WASHINGTON—Women have a survival advantage over men in the hemodialysis (HD) population, study findings presented at the American Society of Nephrology’s Kidney Week 2019 meeting.

In a study of 3506 Japanese HD patients (2080 men, 1426 women) with a median age of 65 years, women had significant 48% and 47% decreased risks of all-cause and infection-related mortality, respectively, compared with men in a fully adjusted model, Hiroaki Tsujikawa, MD, of Kyushu University in Fukuoka, Japan, and colleagues reported in a poster presentation. The fully adjusted model accounted for age, dialysis vintage, diabetic nephropathy, history of cardiovascular disease systolic blood pressure, and numerous other potential confounders.

In propensity score matched analyses, women had significant 59% and 70% decreased risks of all-cause and infection-related mortality, respectively.

During a median follow-up of 8.8 years, 1736 patients died from any cause and 448 died from infection.

Dr Tsujikawa’s team noted that some studies have found that among patients undergoing HD, male patients might be more susceptible to uremia and inflammation-induced anorexia than female patients, and nutritional status may deteriorate over time in male patients. They also pointed out that female sex is associated with a longer life expectancy than male sex in the general population.

Reference

Tsukikawa H, Yamada S, Hiyamuta H, et al. Sex-specific survival advantage in patients undergoing hemodialysis: Ten-year outcomes of the Q-Cohort Study. Presented at the American Society of Nephrology’s Kidney Week 2019 meeting held November 5 to 10 in Washington, DC. Poster SA-PO1045.