Living kidney donors are at increased long-term risk for ischemic heart disease compared with healthy controls, a finding that may be important in the follow-up and selection process of these donors, Norwegian investigators reported at the European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association 2020 virtual congress.

Anders J. Haugen, MD, of Oslo University Hospital in Norway, and colleagues compared 1029 living kidney donors (44% male; mean age at follow-up 56 years) with 16,084 healthy controls (39% male; mean age at follow-up 53 years) who had participated in a general population screening study. Dr Haugen’s team selected controls according to standard donation criteria, assessed in similar time periods as the living donors.

The mean follow-up duration following kidney donation was 11 years. At the time of follow-up, 3.5% of donors had been diagnosed with ischemic heart disease compared with 1.7% of controls. Living kidney donors had significant 64% increased odds of ischemic heart disease compared with controls, after adjusting for sex, age at follow-up, body mass index at baseline, smoking status at baseline, time since donation (time since participation in general population surveys for controls), and systolic blood pressure at baseline, according to the investigators.

The study also found no significant differences between donors and controls in the prevalence of cancer, cerebrovascular disease, and diabetes (3.7 vs 4.4%, 1.8% vs 1.4%, and 4.1% vs 1.9%, respectively).


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Reference

Haugen A, Dahle DO, Hallan SI, et al. Long-term outcomes in live kidney donors: Prevalence of ischemic heart disease, diabetes, cancer and cerebrovascular disease after donation compared to healthy controls. Presented at the European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association 2020 virtual congress. Abstract SO028.