Lower renal function is associated with increased risk of bacteremia, according to data presented at the 56th European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association congress in Budapest, Hungary.

The finding is from an analysis of data from 3,020,717 individuals in multiple nationwide health care registries in Denmark. The study population had a median age of 50 years and median estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, in mL/min/1.73 m2) of 95. All patients had at least 1 recorded plasma creatinine measurement.

The standardized 1-year risks of bacteremia for patients with an eGFR greater than 90, 90-61, 60-46, 45-31, 30-16, and 15 or lower were approximately 1.5%, 1.6%, 2.0%, 2.6%, 3.6%, and 5.6%, respectively, Nicholas Carlson, MD, of Holbaek Hospital in Holbaek, Denmark, and colleagues reported in a poster presentation.

Compared with individuals who had an eGFR above 90, those with an eGFR of 90-61, 60-46, 45-31, 30-16, and 15 or lower had significant 1.06-, 1.39-, 2.40-, and 3.76-fold increased risks of bacteremia, respectively.

Reference

Carlson N, Nelveg-Kristensen KE, Sehested T, et al. Renal function and the associated risk of bacteremia. Presented at the 56th European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association congress in Budapest, Hungary. Abstract FP387.

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