The following article features coverage from the American Urological Association (AUA) 2019 meeting. Click here to read more of Renal & Urology News’ conference coverage.

CHICAGO—Investigators have documented a sustained and definitive increase in the incidence of prostate cancer (PCa) distant metastases at diagnosis, according to a study presentation at the 2019 American Urological Association annual meeting.

The incidence of distant metastases at PCa diagnosis increased gradually from 130.1 to 157.3 per million men aged 50 to 74 years from 2007 to 2015 following a slight decline from 2005 to 2007, Neal Patel, MD, of Weill Cornell Medical College in New York, reported. The incidence increased from 451 to 586.1 per million men aged 75 years or older from 2011 to 2015 after a progressive decline from 2004 to 2011.

The incidence of distant metastases increased significantly from 451 to 504 per million men from 2011 to 2012. Among men aged 75 years or older, the incidence increased from 532.3 to 586.1 per million men from 2014 to 2015.

In contrast, from 2004 to 2015, the incidence of nonmetastatic PCa decreased from 4618 to 2977 per million among men aged 50 to 74 years and from 6919.3 to 3221.1 per million among men aged 75 years or older.

Potential causes of the risk in metastatic disease at presentation among men aged 75 years and older include an evolution in imaging for PCa staging, including the use of positron emission tomography/computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and prostate-specific membrane antigen imaging as well as shifts in PSA screening, Dr Patel told attendees.

Read more of Renal & Urology News’ coverage of the AUA 2019 meeting by visiting the conference page.

Reference

Patel N, Sedrakyan A, Bianco F, et al. Definitive and sustained increase in prostate cancer metastases in the United States. Presented at the 2019 American Urological Association annual meeting held May 3-6 in Chicago. Abstract PD30-10.