Bryan Anderson, Author at Renal and Urology News

Bryan Anderson

All articles by Bryan Anderson

Erythropoietic Protoporphyria (Protoporphyria, Heme synthetase deficiency, Ferrochelatase deficiency, X-linked dominant protoporphyria [XLDPP], Erythrohepatic protoporphyria [no longer used])

Are You Confident of the Diagnosis? What you should be alert for in the history Patients are usually diagnosed with erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP) in infancy, with the rare exception of acquired EPP associated with certain types of cancers. EPP patients often present with photosensitivity (burning and stinging sensation when exposed to sunlight), weakness, malaise, easy…

Ecthyma gangrenosum (dermatitis gangrenosa infantum, disseminated cutaneous gangrene, pemphigus gangrenosus, rupia escharotica; Septicemia due to Pseudomonas)

Are You Confident of the Diagnosis? This chapter will review ecthyma gangrenosum caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. There are many other infectious causes of ecthyma, which are reviewed in a separate chapter. Two forms of ecthyma gangrenosum have been proposed. The first is ecthyma gangrenosum occurring secondary to pseudomonal sepsis. The skin lesions are caused by…

Green Nail Syndrome (GNS, Pseudomonas nail infection, chloronychia, green striped nails, chromonychia)

Are You Confident of the Diagnosis? What you should be alert for in the history Green nail syndrome is caused by infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Patients likely have a history of prolonged exposure to water or detergents (soaps), or an ungual trauma. Characteristic findings on physical examination On physical examination, there is characteristic greenish or…

Hot Foot Syndrome (Pseudomonas Hot-Foot and Hand Syndrome, Pseudomonas Hot-Foot Syndrome)

Are You Confident of the Diagnosis? What you should be alert for in the history Pseudomonas hot-foot syndrome, a primary skin infection caused by the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa, was first recognized as a distinct entity in 2001. Emersion of the feet in contaminated water causes the sudden onset of painful plantar nodules, 6 to 48…

Hot tub folliculitis (Pseudomonas Folliculitis, Hot tub rash, Pseudomonas dermatitis)

Are You Confident of the Diagnosis? Characteristic findings on physical examination Patients will typically present with follicular-based papules and pustules of the trunk and lower extremities (Figure 1). Excoriated papules and small erosions may be present due to patient manipulation. Rarely are the head and neck involved, as most individuals do not submerge their heads…

Neutrophilic Eccrine Hidradenitis (Palmoplantar Eccrine Hidradenitis, (Infectious Eccrine Hidradentitis)

Are You Confident of the Diagnosis? What you should be alert for in the history Neutrophilic eccrine hidradenitis (NEH) is a rare cutaneous disorder that was first recognized and described in 1982. Seventy percent of NEH cases have been observed in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), after receiving chemotherapeutic agents, in particular anthracycline and…

Lymphangioma Circumscriptum (Lymphangiectasia, Dermal Lymphangioma)

Are You Confident of the Diagnosis? What to be alert for in the history A rare condition, lymphangioma circumscriptum (LC) has been divided into two broad categories, each with its own typical presentation and history. These two categories are classical and localized. In the classical form, the condition’s hallmark vesicles are typically present at birth…

Lichenoid Keratosis (lichenoid keratosis, lichen planus-like keratosis)

Are You Confident of the Diagnosis? Characteristic findings on physical examination Lichenoid keratosis (LK) is a common benign skin growth that typically presents as an evolving single discrete papule on the trunk or upper extremities of adults (Figure 1). LK occurs almost always as a solitary skin growth; however, two or three lesions can occasionally…

Lichen Planus

Are You Confident of the Diagnosis? Lichen planus (LP) is a papulosquamous disorder of the skin, mucous membranes, hair, and nails. Depending on subtype and area of involvement, lesions may range from asymptomatic to pruritic and erosive. Patients may have involvement of one or more of the areas listed above. Lesions of the glabrous skin…

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