BMI Mismatch Increases Risk of Kidney Allograft Loss

Each 1 kg/m2 increment in BMI difference between recipients and deceased donors is associated with a 6% increased risk of graft loss.
Each 1 kg/m2 increment in BMI difference between recipients and deceased donors is associated with a 6% increased risk of graft loss.

PHILADELPHIA—Body mass index (BMI) mismatch in deceased kidney donors and recipients is an independent risk factor for kidney graft loss, German researchers reported at the 2015 American Transplant Congress.

Oliver Staeck, MD, and colleagues at Charite Universitaetsmedizin in Berlin conducted a retrospective study of 549 patients who received a kidney from deceased donors from 2000–2013. The cohort had a mean follow-up of 6.4 years. The researchers categorized subjects into 2 groups based on BMI mismatch: 265 patients who received a kidney from a donor with a BMI that differed by 4 kg/m2 or more and 284 patients who received a kidney from a donor with BMI mismatch of less than 4 kg/m2.

At 7 years after transplantation, the death-censored graft survival rate was 82% among recipients with a BMI mismatch of 4 kg/m2 or more compared with 89% among those with a BMI mismatch of less than 4 kg/m2, a significant difference between the groups. The researchers also found that each 1 kg/m2 increment in BMI mismatch was associated with a significant 6% increased risk of graft loss. In addition, each 1 kg/m2 increment in recipient BMI was associated with a significant 5% increased risk of graft loss.

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