Superior Efficacy Reported with Enteric-Coated Mycophenolate

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This article is part of our ongoing coverage of Renal Week 2009. Click here for a complete list of our Renal Week Live articles.


Key Points

  • Enteric-coated mycophenolate (EC-MPS) is more effective than mycophenolate (MMF) in renal transplant patients.
  • At 12 months, biopsy-proven acute rejection had occurred in 20.2% of the EC-MPS group vs. 24.4% of the MMF group.
  • EC-MPS patients had a higher rate of adverse events than the MMF arm at six months but not at 12 months.

Enteric-coated mycophenolate (EC-MPS) is more effective than mycophenolate (MMF) in renal transplant patients, results from a pooled analysis suggest.

Investigators at Careggi University Hospital in Florence, Italy, studied 1,891 renal transplant recipients who participated in four studies. Of these patients, 1,289 received EC-MPS and 602 received MMF with cyclosporine A and steroids.

At 12 months, biopsy-proven acute rejection had occurred in 20.2% of the EC-MPS group vs. 24.4% of the MMF group, according to investigators. Graft loss occurred in 3.5% of the EC-MPS group compared with 6.1% of the MMF group. In addition, 1.2% of EC-MPS recipients died versus 2.3% of those treated with MMF. All of the differences between the groups were statistically significant.

The entry criteria for the four studies were consistent. The starting dose was bioequivalent for MMF (2,000 mg/day) or EC-MPS (1,440 mg/day).

The researchers reported that the EC-MPS patients had a higher rate of adverse events than the MMF arm at six months but not at 12 months.

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