Donor Race May Impact Survival in Kidney Transplant Patients

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This article is part of our coverage of Renal Week 2009. Click here for a complete list of our Renal Week Live articles.


Key Points

  • Kidney transplants within the same races appear to result in better patient survival than transplants between races
  • This is the first study of its kind to look at patient survival in kidney transplants across the races, said investigators.
  • Hepatitis C infection in the donor or recipient was also a significant risk factor for mortality.

SAN DIEGO—Kidney transplants within the same races appear to result in better patient survival than transplants between races, according to study findings presented at the American Society of Nephrology's Renal Week conference.

Using data from the United Network of Organ Sharing on more than 158,000 kidney recipients between 1995 and 2008, researchers analyzed the effect of donor/recipient race disparity on survival.

Non-black recipients who received a kidney from black donors had a significant 11% increased risk of death compared with those who received a kidney from a non-black donor after adjusting for all known variables.

“This study is very important because we need to know what happens when we have a transplant across the races,” investigator Rahul Pandey, MD, a nephrology fellow at Henry Ford Health System in Detroit told Renal & Urology News at Renal Week 2009 in San Diego.

“Black recipients did better when the donors were blacks, and this is important because this is the first study of its kind to look at patient survival in kidney transplants across the races.”

Additionally, the researchers found that hepatitis C infection in the donor or recipient was also a significant risk factor for mortality.

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