Higher PTH Levels Associated with Heart Failure

Share this content:

This article is part of our ongoing coverage of Renal Week 2009. Click here for a complete list of our Renal Week Live articles.


Key Points
  • Among older adults, higher parathyroid hormone levels are associated with heart failure.
  • Lower serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D are associated with all-cause mortality and myocardial infarction.
  • Serum PTH concentrations above 65 pg/mL were associated with a 30% greater risk of heart failure.

Among older adults, higher parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels are associated with heart failure, and lower serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) are associated with all-cause mortality and myocardial infarction (MI), according to researchers.

Investigators evaluated associations of 25-OHD and PTH with cardiovascular events among 2,312 participants in the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS). CHS participants were aged 65 years and older and free of cardiovascular disease at baseline. The median follow-up was 14 years.

Serum PTH concentrations above 65 pg/mL were associated with a 30% greater risk of heart failure. The combination of a 25-OHD level below 15 ng/mL and PTH level above 65 pg/mL was associated with an additional 2.3 deaths per 100-person years, compared with reference categories of a 25-OHD level of 30 ng/mL or higher and a PTH level of 65 pg/mL or higher. Each 10-ng/ml decrease in 25-OHD level was associated with a 9% greater risk of all-cause mortality and a 25% greater risk of MI.

Researchers observed no evidence of a multiplicative interaction between 25-OHD, PTH, and cardiovascular outcomes.

You must be a registered member of Renal and Urology News to post a comment.

Sign Up for Free e-newsletters