Phosphate Levels Higher in African-American CKD Patients

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This article is part of our ongoing coverage of Renal Week 2009. Click here for a complete list of our Renal Week Live articles.


Key Points

  • Among CKD patients, African Americans have significantly higher serum phosphate levels than whites.
  • For the study population as whole, mean serum phosphate and the prevalence of hyperphosphatemia increased with decreasing levels of annual income.
  • The impact of race on serum phosphate is mitigated by unmeasured factors associated with low socioeconomic factors, researchers concluded.

Among CKD patients, African Americans have significantly higher serum phosphate levels than whites, researchers have found.

Their analysis of 1,658 African Americans and 1,767 whites in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Study (CRIC) showed that the mean serum phosphate levels were 3.8 mg/dL in African Americans compared with 3.6 mg/dL in whites, after adjusting for age, gender, estimated glomerular filtration rate, diabetes, dietary phosphorus intake, phosphate binder use, and vitamin D.

In addition, African-American race was associated with a 40% increased risk of hyperphosphatemia compared with whites, but this association was attenuated after adjusting for multiple variables.

For the study population as whole, mean serum phosphate and the prevalence of hyperphosphatemia increased with decreasing levels of annual income, according to findings reported at the American Society of Nephrology's Renal Week 2009 in San Diego by a group led by Orlando M. Gutiérrez, MD, of the University of Miami.

Moreover, the association between race and serum phosphate was modified by income. Although serum phosphate levels remained higher in African Americans than whites in the three highest levels of income, the differences were attenuated among those in the lowest income level ($20,000 per year or less).

This finding suggests that “the impact of race on serum phosphate is mitigated by unmeasured factors associated with low socioeconomic factors,” Dr. Gutierriez's group concluded.

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