Hyperphosphatemia Afflicts Nearly Three-Fourths of HD Patients

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This article is part of our ongoing coverage of Renal Week 2009. Click here for a complete list of our Renal Week Live articles.


Key Points

  • Researchers who reviewed data from about 60,000 hemodialysis (HD) patients found that 73% of them experienced hyperphosphatemia.
  • Hypocalcemia and hypercalcemia developed in 30% and 41%, respectively, researchers reported.
  • Investigators concluded that identification of factors that contribute to these biochemical disturbances may help refine clinical management strategies to limit the risks associated with abnormalities in mineral metabolism among HD patients.

Researchers who reviewed data from about 60,000 hemodialysis (HD) patients found that 73% of them experienced hyperphosphatemia.

Hypocalcemia and hypercalcemia developed in 30% and 41%, respectively, researchers reported in a Renal Week 2009 abstract.

The study, by Ryan D. Kilpatrick, PhD, and colleagues at Amgen, Inc., in Thousand Oaks, Calif., included subjects receiving HD between July 2000 and June 2002. The researchers monitored patients until either a biochemical event, a censoring event, or Dec. 31, 2003.

Patients who experienced hyperphosphatemia were younger than those who did not (64 vs. 68 years) but had a longer time on dialysis (2.1 vs. 1.9 years). Patients who experienced hypocalcemic events were younger than those who did not (58 vs. 63 years) and had a shorter time on dialysis (2.0 vs. 2.2 years). Subjects who had hypercalcemia did not differ significantly in age from those who did not (60 vs. 61 years), but they had a longer time on dialysis (2.3 vs. 1.7 years).

Researchers defined hyperphosphatemia as a serum phosphorus level above 5.5 mg/dL and hypocalcemia and hypercalcemia as albumin-corrected serum calcium levels of less than 8.4 and more than 10.2 g/dL, respectively.

The investigators concluded that identification of factors that contribute to these biochemical disturbances may help refine clinical management strategies to limit the risks associated with abnormalities in mineral metabolism among HD patients.

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