Higher Dietary Phosphorus Intake Raises Mortality Risk

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This article is part of our ongoing coverage of Renal Week 2009. Click here for a complete list of our Renal Week Live articles.


Key Points

  • Higher dietary phosphorus intake is associated with increased mortality in patients on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD).
  • The finding is based on a study of a five-year prospective cohort of 224 randomly selected MHD patients.
  • Compared with patients in the first tertile, those in the highest tertile had a nearly 2.5 times increased risk of death.

Higher dietary phosphorus intake is associated with increased mortality in patients on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD), data show.

“There is a graded association between dietary phosphorus intake and survival,” said lead investigator Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh, MD, PhD, MPH, Associate Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics at the University of California-Los Angeles David Geffen School of Medicine.

The finding is based on a study of a five-year prospective cohort of 224 randomly selected MHD patients (mean age 55 years). Patients had been on MHD for mean of 35 months.

Researchers used food frequency questionnaires to assess dietary intake during the first six months of the study. The researchers divided patients into tertiles of estimated dietary phosphorus intake: less than 532 (reference), 532-777, and greater than 777 mg/day.

Compared with patients in the first tertile, those in the highest tertile had a nearly 2.5 times increased risk of death after adjusting for case-mix, age, gender, race, comorbidities, nutritional status, inflammation, serum phosphorus, and other potential confounders.

The study population was 48% women, 62% diabetic, 53% Hispanic, and 25% black.

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