Quarter of Metastatic PCa Patients Had Synchronous Cancer

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28.1% of patients with metastatic prostate cancer have a synchronous second primary cancer.
28.1% of patients with metastatic prostate cancer have a synchronous second primary cancer.

(HealthDay News) -- More than one-quarter of patients with metastatic prostate cancer present with a synchronous second primary malignancy, according to a review published in The Journal of Urology.

Kyo Chul Koo, M.D., Ph.D., from the Yonsei University College of Medicine in Seoul, South Korea, and colleagues conducted a retrospective record review of 582 consecutive patents with prostate cancer diagnosed with metastasis. The authors examined the prognostic impact of a synchronous second primary malignancy, defined as a cytologically or histologically proven solid malignancy, on overall survival.

The researchers found that 28.1% of patients had a synchronous second primary malignancy, of which the most prevalent types were colorectal (9.1%), stomach (7.3%), and lung (7.1%) cancers. During a median follow-up of 34.1 months, the rate of overall survival was significantly higher for patients without a synchronous secondary primary malignancy versus those with lung or stomach cancer. Outcomes were comparable for men without a second malignancy and for those with colorectal cancer. Independent predictors of overall mortality included clinical stage T4 or greater, American Society of Anesthesiologists score 1 or greater, and lung or stomach cancer.

"A substantial proportion of patients with metastatic prostate cancer present with a synchronous second primary malignancy," the authors write. "Definitive therapy targeting prostate cancer may confer a limited survival benefit in patients with synchronous lung or stomach cancer."

Source

  1. Koo, KC, et al. The Journal of Urology, April 2015; doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2014.10.088.
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