Gene Can Predict Aggressive Prostate Cancer at Diagnosis

the Renal and Urology News take:

Researchers have identified a biomarker present on the KLK3 gene that can predict which GS7 prostate cancer patients will have a more aggressive form of cancer, according to research published in Clinical Cancer Research.

In the study, researchers looked at inherited genetic variants to investigate whether there would be any potential biomarkers for prostate cancer patients. They studied the genetic makeup of 72 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified from the genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in 1,827 prostate cancer patients.

Researchers analyzed associations of the SNPs with disease aggression, comparing them in clinically defined high- and low-aggressive cases. They found one SNP on the KLK3 gene, which is responsible for encoding the prostate-specific antigen, that can predict an aggressive form of GS7 disease.

GS7 prostate cancers account for 30 to 40% of all prostate cancers. Previously there was no way to stratify these patients, who can have diverse prognoses. This new biomarker can help personalize treatment for GS7 patients, though researchers hope to identify even more biomarkers that can further indicate patients’ prognoses.

The researchers at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center are expanding the study to systematically investigate genetic variants in microRNA regulatory pathways to identify more biomarkers for the prognosis of prostate cancer patients.

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A biomarker present on the KLK3 gene can predict which prostate cancer patients will be aggressive.

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have identified a biomarker living next door to the KLK3 gene that can predict which GS7 prostate cancer patients will have a more aggressive form of cancer.

The results reported in the journal of Clinical Cancer Research, a publication of the American Association of Cancer Research, indicate the KLK3 gene -- a gene on chromosome 19 responsible for encoding the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) -- is not only associated with prostate cancer aggression, but a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) on it is more apparent in cancer patients with GS7.

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