Sleep Apnea Hinders Glucose Control in Untreated Diabetes

the Renal and Urology News take:

Obstructive sleep apnea may hinder glucose control in people untreated for type 2 diabetes and those newly diagnosed, according to a new study published in the Journal of Sleep Research. Sleep apnea may have less impact on diabetes patients already treated with medication.

For the study, investigators reviewed sleep recordings of 762 patients from multiple centers. Nearly 500 were previously diagnosed and treated for type 2 diabetes; 265 were untreated but were found to have elevated fasting blood glucose or glycated hemoglobin consistent with type 2 diabetes.

Among the untreated patients, hemoglobin A1c was associated with indices of apnea-hypopnea and 3% oxygen desaturation; the researchers adjusted for factors such as gender, body mass index (BMI), alcohol habits, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, and statin use. Average HbA1c increased from 6.68% in the group with the lowest scores on the apnea-hypopnea index to 7.2% in the group with the highest scores.

In treated patients, HbA1c was associated with variables unrelated to sleep apnea, such as insulin use.

Nighttime Iron Intake May Disturb Glucose Metabolism
Obstructive sleep apnea may adversely affect glucose control in patients with newly diagnosed and untreated type 2 diabetes.

Priou P, et al. – The purpose of this study was to determine whether the association between obstructive sleep apnea severity and glucose control differs between patients with newly diagnosed and untreated type 2 diabetes, and patients with known and treated type 2 diabetes. Obstructive sleep apnea may adversely affect glucose control in patients with newly diagnosed and untreated type 2 diabetes, but may have a limited impact in patients with overt type 2 diabetes receiving anti–diabetic medications. Read more from MDLinx…

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