Intensive Home HD, Deceased-Donor Transplants Offer Similar Survival

Share this content:
After adjusting for confounders, patients on intensive home hemodialysis and recipients of deceased-donor kidneys showed no significant difference in death risk
After adjusting for confounders, patients on intensive home hemodialysis and recipients of deceased-donor kidneys showed no significant difference in death risk
The following article is part of conference coverage from Kidney Week 2017 in New Orleans hosted by the American Society of Nephrology. Renal & Urology News staff will be reporting live on medical studies conducted by nephrologists and other specialists who are tops in their field in acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, dialysis, transplantation, and more. Check back for the latest news from Kidney Week 2017.

NEW ORLEANS—Survival of patients receiving intensive home hemodialysis (IHHD) is similar to those who undergo a deceased-donor kidney transplant, data presented at the American Society of Nephrology's Kidney Week 2017 meeting suggest.

In a study comparing 116 IHHD and 3097 deceased-donor kidney transplant patients, Angie G. Nishio-Lucar, MD, of the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, and colleagues found that the transplant recipients had better survival. The 5-year survival probability was 79% for IHHD patients versus 84% for the transplant patients. After adjusting for cause of end-stage renal disease, sex, age, and peripheral vascular disease, however, the groups showed no significant difference in the risk of death. The authors concluded that IHHD could be a reasonable alternative to decease-donor kidney transplantation.

Dr Nishio-Lucar's team studied consecutive adult patients who received a first kidney transplant or started IHHD in the same region of Virginia from October 1997 to June 2014. They obtained transplant data from the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients and IHHD patient data from Lynchburg Nephrology Physicians practice in Lynchburg, Virginia. The IHHD and transplant cohorts had similar proportions of female patients (41.4% and 40.5%, respectively), black patients (50.9% and 48.9%), and diabetics (37.1% and 36.5%). Compared with transplant patients, the IHHD patients were more likely to be obese and have a history of malignancy.

Visit Renal & Urology News' conference section for continuous coverage from Kidney Week 2017.

Reference

Nishio-Lucar AG, Lyons GR, Bose S, Lockridge RS. Intensive home hemodialysis survival is comparable to deceased donor kidney transplant. Presented in poster format at Kidney Week 2017 in New Orleans (Oct. 31 to Nov. 5). Poster FR-PO1017.

You must be a registered member of Renal and Urology News to post a comment.

Sign Up for Free e-newsletters