ESRD Linked to Recurrent Symptomatic Kidney Stones

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Recurrent, but not first-time, symptomatic kidney stone formers are at elevated risk for end-stage renal disease and death.
Recurrent, but not first-time, symptomatic kidney stone formers are at elevated risk for end-stage renal disease and death.
The following article is part of conference coverage from Kidney Week 2017 in New Orleans hosted by the American Society of Nephrology. Renal & Urology News staff will be reporting live on medical studies conducted by nephrologists and other specialists who are tops in their field in acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, dialysis, transplantation, and more. Check back for the latest news from Kidney Week 2017.

NEW ORLEANS—Patients who suffer from recurrent symptomatic kidney stones are at elevated risk for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and death, investigators reported at the American Society of Nephrology's Kidney Week 2017 meeting. The first symptomatic kidney stone does not increase the risk of these outcomes.

Tsering Dhondup, MD, and collaborators at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, compared 7008 stone formers (SFs) and 27,149 age and sex matched controls. Over a mean follow-up of 9.4 years, ESRD developed in 68 and 110 SFs and controls, respectively, and 1110 and 3839 deaths occurred in these groups, respectively.

Compared with controls, recurrent SFs had a significant 3.3 times and 1.2 times increased risk of ESRD and death, respectively. First-time symptomatic SFs had a non-significant 1.4 and 1.05 times increased risk of ESRD and death, respectively.

“The risk of ESRD and mortality may be higher in recurrent than incident symptomatic SFs due to more substantial renal injury from more severe stone disease,” the investigators concluded. “Thus efforts to reduce kidney stone recurrence may have beneficial impact on ESRD and mortality risk.” Asymptomatic SFs also had a significant 3.8 and 1.4 times increased risk of ESRD and death, respectively.

The author's hypothesized that patients who undergo abdominal imaging will be more likely to have incidentally discovered asymptomatic stones, but it is other medical conditions that lead to ESRD or death

Visit Renal & Urology News' conference section for continuous coverage from Kidney Week 2017.


 

Reference

Dhondup T, Kittanamongkolchai W, Mehta RA, et al. Recurrent but not first time symptomatic kidney stone formers are at higher risk for ESRD and death. Data presented in poster format at Kidney Week 2017 in New Orleans (Oct. 31 to Nov. 5). Abstract TH-PO1082.

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