Kidney Week 2011 General News Coverage

Portable Home Dialysis Unit Improves QoL

PHILADELPHIA—End-stage renal disease patients who dialyzed with a portable hemodialysis (HD) system for 12 months reported improvements in their overall quality of life (QoL), according to findings presented at Kidney Week 2011.

Gout Prevalence High in CKD Patients

PHILADELPHIA—Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a relatively high prevalence of gout compared with the general population, according to data presented at Kidney Week 2011.

Lower CKD Risk Found with High Salt Intake

Lower CKD Risk Found with High Salt Intake

PHILADELPHIA—High dietary salt intake may decrease the risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and low dietary potassium intake may increase the risk, investigators reported at Kidney Week 2011.

Increasing Phosphate Raises Death, CV Risks in Hemodialysis Patients

PHILADELPHIA—Baseline plasma phosphate level is an important risk factor for cardiovascular events and mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients, investigators reported at Kidney Week 2011.

Predialysis Factors and the Timing of Dialysis Initiation among Older Adults

In a study presented at Kidney Week of 70,662 patients who initiated dialysis at 67 years or older, Deidra C. Crews, MD, of Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions in Baltimore, and colleagues found that a greater burden of comorbidities, frequent nephrology visits, and hospitalization for congestive heart failure were associated with early dialysis initiation.

Renal and Death Risks Lower with Metformin than Sulfonylureas

PHILADELPHIA—Initiating treatment of type 2 diabetes with sulfonylurea drugs is associated with an increased risk of renal function decline, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), or death compared with starting treatment on metformin, according to study findings presented at Kidney Week 2011.

Coronary Artery Calcification an MI Risk Factor in CKD Patients

PHILADELPHIA—Coronary artery calcification (CAC) provides additional predictive value for the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), according to data presented at Kidney Week 2011.

High FGF-23 in AKI Patients Predicts Worse Outcomes

PHILADELPHIA—Levels of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) are elevated in acute kidney injury (AKI) and are associated with an increased risk of death or need for renal replacement therapy (RRT), data presented at Kidney Week 2011 suggest.

Predialysis Renal Decline Patterns Identified

PHILADELPHIA—Researchers have found substantial heterogeneity in trajectories of renal function during the two-year period leading up to initiation of chronic dialysis, according to a report presented at Kidney Week 2011.

Rapid Renal Decline in the Elderly Linked to Systolic Blood Pressure

PHILADELPHIA—Elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP) contributes substantially to rapid declines in renal function in older adults, investigators reported at Kidney Week 2011.

Dialysis-Requiring AKI Rises Sharply

PHILADELPHIA—Acute kidney injury (AKI), also known as acute renal failure, requiring dialysis has become more common than end-stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT), according to findings presented at Kidney Week 2011.

FGF-23 Levels Are Elevated in Children, Adults with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease, Preserved Renal Function

Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) levels, which have been shown previously to be elevated in adults with autosomal polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), are elevated early in the course of the disease, when kidney function is intact, investigators reported at Kidney Week 2011.

Long-Term Risks of Hospital Readmission, Death in Patients with Kidney Disease

Long-term risks of hospital readmission and death for patients with chronic kidney disease or who are on dialysis or have received a kidney transplant were among the highest observed in a large, statewide population, according to study findings presented at Kidney Week 2011.

Predictors of Hospitalizations in Maintenance HD Patients

A study of 5,758 hemodialysis patients showed a significant association between hospitalization and potentially modifiable indicators of fluid overload (for example, interdialytic weight gain), anemia management (hemoglobin levels and transferrin saturation), and vascular access (catheter), investigators reported at Kidney Week 2011.

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