Patients with Multiple Stones At Higher Risk of Recurrent Stones

Study also shows that hypocitraturia is more common in patients with multiple stones.
Study also shows that hypocitraturia is more common in patients with multiple stones.

Patients with multiple ureteral stones are more likely than those with a single ureteral stone to have hypocitraturia and to experience stone recurrence, a study found.

Ho Won Kang, MD, of Chungbuk National University in Cheongju, Korea, and colleagues compared 911 patients who had ureteral stones for the first time and 107 age- and sex-matched patients without stones.

The researchers classified the stone patients into 2 groups: those with a single stone (690 patients) and those with 1 or more additional stones in a ureter or kidney (212 patients). They performed a 24-hour urinary metabolic evaluation was performed on all patients.

Compared with patients who had a single stone, those with multiple stones had a significantly higher incidence of hypocitraturia (32.1% vs. 18.6%), Dr. Kang and colleagues reported in Urology (2014;84:274-278)..

For their recurrence analyses, the researchers included 240 stone patients who were followed up for more than 12 months (median 35 months). Patients with multiple stones had a 2.3 times increased risk of stone recurrence compared with patients who had a single stone.

“Patients with multiple stones, even it is their first stone episode, should undergo metabolic evaluation and possibly also potassium citrate therapy to prevent future stones,” the authors concluded.

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