Higher Testosterone Levels May Hike Renal Stone Risk

Mean levels of total serum testosterone and serum dihydrotestosterone were significantly higher in renal stone cases compared with controls.
Mean levels of total serum testosterone and serum dihydrotestosterone were significantly higher in renal stone cases compared with controls.

Elevated levels of serum testosterone may promote formation of renal stones, researchers in India reported in the International Journal of Applied & Basic Medical Research (2016;6:241-244).

Kapil Gupta, PhD, and colleagues at the Adesh Institute of Medical Sciences and Research in Punjab, India, conducted a case-control study that included 108 men: 78 diagnosed with urolithiasis (cases) and 30 age-matched healthy controls. Mean levels of total serum testosterone and serum dihydrotestosterone were significantly higher in cases (5.52 ng/dL and 419 pg/mL, respectively) compared with controls (4.36 ng/dL and 300.1 pg/mL, respectively). Cases and controls were similar with respect to mean levels of free testosterone and serum estradiol levels as well as mean age and body mass index.

Dr Gupta's group cited a previous report in which researchers concluded that testosterone appears to promote renal stone formation by suppressing renal osteopontin expression in the kidneys and increasing urinary oxalate excretion.

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