Hyponatremia May Predict Contrast-Induced Nephropathy

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PRAGUE—Transient hyponatremia may precede development of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) in patients undergoing coronary angiography, according to investigators.

Sejoong Kim, MD, and collaborators at Gachon University of Medicine and Science in Incheon, Korea, enrolled 51 patients undergoing coronary angiography and tested changes in electrolytes and renal function at hour 0, 6, 12, and 24 hours.

Twelve patients (23.5%) experienced CIN and eight (15.6%) experienced hyponatremia. The CIN group had lower levels of sodium and higher levels of serum osmolality at hour 6 and 12. At hour 24, serum sodium levels were similar between the two groups.

At hour 12, each 1 mmol/L increment in serum sodium was associated with an approximately 33% decreased risk of CIN after adjusting for age, gender, hypertension, diabetes, and contrast media volume, the investigators reported at the 48th congress of the European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association.

The findings suggest that hyponatremia could have a role in the pathogenesis of CIN and that it may be a useful predictor of CIN, the authors concluded.

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