Most Gout Inadequately Controlled

Patients with inadequately controlled gout experience lower quality of life and report worse functioning.
Patients with inadequately controlled gout experience lower quality of life and report worse functioning.

Gout is inadequately controlled in more than two-thirds of sufferers, adversely affecting their health-related quality of life (HRQOL), daily functioning, and work productivity, researchers found.

In a study of 1,204 gout sufferers with a mean age of 61.9 years, Robert Wood, BSc, of Adelphi Real World in Cheshire, U.K., and colleagues found that 836 (69%) had inadequately controlled and 368 (31%) had adequately controlled gout, according to an online report in The Journal of Rheumatology. The authors defined inadequate control as a serum uric acid (SUA) level greater than 6 mg/dL on the most recent SUA test or 2 or more flares in the past 12 months and adequate control as an SUA level of 6 mg/dL or less and no flares.

Patients with inadequately controlled gout reported significantly worse functioning and HRQOL as measured by the EQ-5D and Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Health Assessment Questionnaire (PROMIS HAQ) scales. Significantly more inadequately controlled versus adequately controlled patients reported problems with pain/discomfort, self-care, anxiety/depression, mobility, and performing usual activities.

In addition, patients with inadequately controlled gout missed significantly more work time than those with adequately controlled group (4.5% vs. 1.3%). They also had greater overall work impairment due to gout.

“Improved gout treatment strategies remain a critical unmet need; steps to enhance the control of hyperuricemia may lead to gout symptom improvements and a resultant increase in HRQOL and work productivity,” the authors concluded.

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