Differences in Interarm BP Linked to Increased Mortality

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Differences in Interarm BP Linked to Increased Mortality
Differences in Interarm BP Linked to Increased Mortality

For patients with hypertension, an interarm difference in systolic blood pressure of 10 mm Hg or more or 15 mm Hg or more is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality over 10 years, according to a study published online BMJ.

Christopher E. Clark, PhD, of the University of Exeter in Devon, U.K., and colleagues analyzed bilateral blood pressure measurements recorded at three successive surgery attendances in 230 people receiving treatment for hypertension in a rural primary care setting. Cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality were recorded during a median follow-up of 9.8 years.

The researchers found that 24% of participants had a mean interarm difference in systolic blood pressure of 10 mm Hg or more and 9% had a difference of 15 mm Hg or more, at recruitment. These differences correlated with a 3.6 and 3.1 times increased risk of all-cause mortality, respectively. Among 183 participants without pre-existing cardiovascular disease, an interarm difference in systolic blood pressure of 10 mm Hg or more or 15 mm Hg or more  was associated with a 2.7 and 2.6 times increased risk of all-cause mortality. There was a weaker association between an interarm difference in diastolic blood pressure of 10 mm Hg or more and an increased risk of cardiovascular events or death.

"Differences in systolic blood pressure between arms can predict an increased risk of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality over 10 years in people with hypertension," the authors wrote.

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