Dialyzing Longer Improves Outcomes

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Patients receiving thrice-weekly in-center hemodialysis have better outcomes and survival if they dialyze longer, according to investigators.

Analyzing data from the international Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Study (DOPPS), Francesca Tentori, MD, of the Arbor Research Collaborative for Health in Ann Arbor, Mich., and colleagues found each 30 minutes in treatment time was associated with a 6% decreased risk of all-cause mortality, 5% decreased risk of cardiovascular mortality, and 7% decreased risk of sudden death, according to an online report in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation.

In addition, longer treatment times were associated with lower pre- and post-dialysis systolic blood pressure, greater intradialytic weight loss, lower serum phosphorus levels, higher levels of serum albumin, potassium, and hemoglobin (for the same erythropoietin dose), Dr. Tentori's team found.

The study included 37,414 patients on thrice-weekly in-center HD with prescribed treatment times of 120-420 minutes. The facility mean treatment time ranged from 214 minutes in the United States to 256 minutes in Australia and New Zealand.

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