Genitourinary Injuries Often Related to Consumer Products

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Genitourinary Injuries Often Related to Consumer Products
Genitourinary Injuries Often Related to Consumer Products

Acute genitourinary injuries most commonly occur in males, with the highest prevalence among young adults, and are frequently associated with consumer products such as sporting items, according to research published online in The Journal of Urology.

Herman S. Bagga, MD, of the University of California-San Francisco, and colleagues assessed adult genitourinary injuries related to consumer products using data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System from 2002 to 2010. National estimates were derived from 3,545 observations.

The researchers found that an estimated 142,144 adults presented to U.S. emergency departments with genitourinary injuries from 2002-2010. Of the injuries, 69% occurred in men, and the large majority involved external genitalia. Sporting items, articles of clothing, and furniture were the most common categories of products involved in injuries, accounting for 30.2%, 9.4%, and 9.2%, respectively. Injury prevalence was highest among 18- to 28-year-olds (37.5%), which was most often related to sports equipment use. Among older adults over the age of 65, injuries were more commonly sustained during falls, often in the bathroom. The majority (88%) of patients were treated in the emergency department without need for admission, while the rate of admission rose with increasing age.

"Our study identifies patterns of injury with common consumer products and particular at-risk patient cohorts," the authors wrote. "This epidemiological information can be used to promote injury prevention via targeted product and behavior modifications, as well as via education of consumers and practitioners to assist in the limitation and informed treatment of such injuries."

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