Erectile Dysfunction (ED) Linked to Early Vascular Disease

the Renal and Urology News take:

Men with asymptomatic vascular disease are more likely to develop erectile dysfunction (ED) compared to those who don’t, according to research presented at the 2014 American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions.

Researchers led by David Feldman, BS, of the Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease at Johns Hopkins University observed 1,862 men without existing heart disease, looking at the relationship between atherosclerotic plaque development and self-reported ED.

“We looked at which measurement of early vascular disease was the best predictor for ED,” Dr. Feldman said. “We also looked at whether those men with multiple abnormalities, such as increased plaque in addition to arterial stiffness and dysfunction, were more likely to also suffer.”

They found that men with coronary artery calcium scores (calcified plaque in the arteries) of greater than 100 Agatston units were 43% more likely to self-report ED compared to those with normal calcium scores. Men who subsequently had ED were at least twice as likely to have coronary artery calcium scores greater than 100 Agatston units.

Dr. Feldman advised a heart-healthy diet with regular physical activity to improve long-term erectile function and reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk In these men.

An SBP target of about 120–140 rather than below 140 mm Hg may be more beneficial.
Men with asymptomatic vascular disease are more likely to develop ED.

Men who have asymptomatic subclinical vascular disease are more likely to develop erectile dysfunction than men who don't have early stage vascular disease, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014.

"Erectile function can be a window into men's cardiovascular and overall health," said David I. Feldman, B.S., lead author and research assistant at the Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore, Maryland. "Erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular disease commonly coexist."

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