Death Rate Similar in DCCT/EDIC, General Population

Significantly higher mortality in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial conventional therapy group.
Significantly higher mortality in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial conventional therapy group.

(HealthDay News) -- Overall mortality is similar in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (DCCT/EDIC) study cohort and the general population, according to a study published online in Diabetes Care.

John M. Lachin, ScD, from the George Washington University Biostatistics Center in Rockville, Maryland, and colleagues compared mortality in the DCCT/EDIC study cohort to that of the general population. They estimated expected mortality during DCCT/EDIC using the current age-, sex-, and race-specific risks in the general US population, and compared observed versus expected mortality.

The researchers found that, compared with the general US population, mortality in the DCCT intensive therapy group was nonsignificantly lower (standardized mortality ratio [SMR], 0.88; 95% confidence interval, 0.67 to 1.16), while mortality in the DCCT conventional therapy group was significantly higher (SMR, 1.31; 95% confidence interval, 1.05 to 1.65). There was an increase in SMR with increasing mean hemoglobin A1c; the rate of increase in SMR was greater among females than males with hemoglobin A1c above 9.0%.

"Overall mortality in the combined DCCT/EDIC cohort was similar to that of the general population but was higher in the DCCT conventional therapy group," the authors write.

Several pharmaceutical companies provided free or discounted supplies or equipment to support participant adherence to the study.

Source

1. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT)/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) Study Research Group. Mortality in Type 1 Diabetes in the DCCT/EDIC Versus the General Population. Diabetes Care. 2016 Jul; dc152399. doi: 10.2337/dc15-2399.

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