Cognitive Therapy Improves Depressive Symptoms in Diabetics

This article originally appeared here.
Improvements in depressive symptoms, well-being, distress with MBCT, CBT.
Improvements in depressive symptoms, well-being, distress with MBCT, CBT.

For patients with diabetes and depressive symptoms, individual mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) and individual cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) improve depressive symptoms, according to a study published online in Diabetes Care.

K. Annika Tovote, from the University Medical Center Groningen in the Netherlands, and colleagues conducted a randomized controlled trial involving 94 outpatients with types 1 and 2 diabetes and comorbid depressive symptoms. Participants were randomly allocated to receive MBCT (31 patients), CBT (32 patients), or waiting list (31 patients). Participants completed written questionnaires and interviews before treatment and three months later.

The researchers found that significantly greater reductions were seen in depressive symptoms for patients receiving MBCT and CBT compared with waiting-list control (P = 0.004 and P < 0.001; clinically relevant improvement, 26 and 29 versus 4 percent, respectively). Significant positive effects were seen for anxiety, well-being, and diabetes-related distress with both interventions. There was no significant effect on glycated hemoglobin values.

"Both individual MBCT and CBT are effective in improving a range of psychological symptoms in individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes," the authors write.

Loading links....
You must be a registered member of Renal and Urology News to post a comment.