Coffee May Cut Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Conversely, reducing coffee intake may increase risk of type 2 diabetes.
Conversely, reducing coffee intake may increase risk of type 2 diabetes.

Increasing coffee consumption may lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to research published online in Diabetologia.

Shilpa N. Bhupathiraju, M.D., of the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, and colleagues prospectively followed three large cohorts of men and women in the United States to assess the association between changes in coffee and tea consumption and subsequent risk of type 2 diabetes.

The researchers found that participants who drank more than one additional cup of coffee per day (median change, 1.69 cups/day), compared with those who made no changes in coffee consumption, during a four-year period were 11 percent less likely (95 percent confidence interval [CI], 3 to 18 percent) to develop type 2 diabetes in the subsequent four years.

Participants who drank less coffee (median change, −2 cups/day), compared with those who made no changes in coffee consumption, were 17 percent more likely (95 percent CI, 8 to 26 percent) to develop type 2 diabetes. No association was observed between changes in tea consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes.

"These changes in risk were observed for caffeinated, but not decaffeinated, coffee and were independent of initial coffee consumption and four-year changes in other dietary and lifestyle factors," the authors write.

One author disclosed financial ties to Nestec, a company that sells food and coffee.

Loading links....
You must be a registered member of Renal and Urology News to post a comment.