Coffee Linked With Lower Diabetes Risk

This article originally appeared here.
Association found for both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee.
Association found for both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee.

Higher consumption of coffee is associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes, according to research published in Diabetes Care.

Ming Ding, of the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, and colleagues conducted a systematic review of the literature and performed a meta-analysis of 28 prospective cohort or nested case-control studies. The authors sought to assess the effect of coffee consumption on risk of type 2 diabetes.

The researchers found that, compared with no coffee or rare consumption of coffee, the relative risk (RR) for type 2 diabetes was 0.92 (95 percent confidence interval [CI], 0.90 to 0.94) for one cup per day; 0.85 (95 percent CI, 0.82 to 0.88) for two cups per day; 0.79 (95 percent CI, 0.75 to 0.83) for three cups per day; 0.75 (95 percent CI, 0.71 to 0.80) for four cups per day; 0.71 (95 percent CI, 0.65 to 0.76) for five cups per day; and 0.67 (95 percent CI, 0.61 to 0.74) for six cups per day. No significant difference was found between the reduced risk of diabetes associated with a one cup per day increase for caffeinated coffee (RR, 0.91; 95 percent CI, 0.89 to 0.94) versus decaffeinated coffee (RR, 0.94; 95 percent CI, 0.91 to 0.98) (P for difference = 0.17).

"Coffee consumption was inversely associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes in a dose-response manner," the authors write. "Both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee was associated with reduced diabetes risk.

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