Muscle Mass Not Accurate in Predicting Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

the Renal and Urology News take:

Researchers out of Yale University have found that muscle mass is not as accurate a predictor of chronic kidney disease (CKD) as previously believed. Their study was published in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

They looked 3,604 CKD patients to study the possible association between outcomes of death and dialysis and their relation to muscle mass, which has been shown to be predictive of these two outcomes in other disease states.

The researchers found that lower levels of urinary creatinine excretion were strongly associated with increased mortality and progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD).

However, when they looked at bioelectrical impedance analysis in order to estimate body fat as an indication of muscle mass, they found no association with worsening CKD.

“There was nothing there,” said F. Perry Wilson, MD, MSCE, a nephrologist at the Yale School of Medicine. “This suggests it is not just about muscle mass. This presents something of a paradigm shift in how we should think of urine creatinine.”

Muscle Mass Not Accurate in Predicting Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)
Muscle mass is not as accurate a predictor of CKD as previously believed.

New research by a Yale University scientist suggests that muscle mass is not as accurate a predictor of chronic kidney disease outcomes as previously thought. In a study published online Nov. 7 by the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, researchers looked at data from 3,604 patients with chronic kidney disease. They checked for an association between CKD outcomes (death and dialysis) and a pair of factors related to muscle mass.

Muscle mass has been shown to be predictive of these outcomes in other disease states. For the first factor, creatinine excretion in urine, doctors did find an association. Lower levels of urinary creatinine excretion were “strongly” associated with increased mortality and progression to end-stage renal disease.

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