Medications Increase Hospitalization for Heat-Related Illnesses

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Commonly used meds linked to increased risk of hospitalization for dehydration, heat-related illness.
Commonly used meds linked to increased risk of hospitalization for dehydration, heat-related illness.

(HealthDay News) -- Among veterans, initiation of many commonly-used medications is associated with increased risk of hospitalization for dehydration or heat-related illness, according to research published online in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics.

Lisa M. Kalisch Ellett, PhD, from the University of South Australia in Adelaide, and colleagues conducted a retrospective analysis using prescription event symmetry analysis for 6,700 veterans with incident hospital admission for dehydration or heat-related illness.

The researchers found that the risk of incident hospital admission for dehydration or heat-related illness was significantly increased following initiation of anticoagulants, cardiovascular medicines, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antipsychotics, antidepressants, and anticholinergic agents. There was variation in the risk of hospital admission for dehydration or heat-related illness from 1.17 for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor to 2.79 for angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor plus diuretic combination product. Initiation of anticonvulsants, anti-Parkinson's agents, hypnotics, anxiolytics, or antihistamines was not significantly associated with hospital admission for dehydration or heat-related illness.

"Many commonly used medicines were found to be associated with increased risk of hospitalization for dehydration or heat-related illness," the authors write. "Prescribers and patients should be aware of the potential for medicines to be associated with increased risk of dehydration and heat-related illness."

Source

1. Kalisch Ellett LM, Pratt NL, Le Blanc VT, Westaway K, Roughead EE. Increased risk of hospital admission for dehydration or heat-related illness after initiation of medicines: a sequence symmetry analysis. J Clin Pharm Ther. doi: 10.1111/jcpt.12418.

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