Study: Low-Risk PCa Increasingly T1c

Men diagnosed today have lower PSA levels and tumor volume than men 15 years ago.
Men diagnosed today have lower PSA levels and tumor volume than men 15 years ago.

ORLANDO—Men diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer (PCa) today are more likely to have T1c disease, lower PSA levels, and lower tumor volume than men diagnosed with low-risk PCa 15 years ago, according to data presented at the American Urological Association 2014 annual meeting.

Using the National Prostate Cancer Register of Sweden, Erin Ohmann, MD, of New York University Langone Medical Center in New York, and colleagues identified 30,121 men diagnosed during 1998-2011 with low-risk PCa, defined as clinical stage T1-2, Gleason score of 6 or less, and PSA level below 10 ng/mL.

During the study period, the proportion of men diagnosed with low-risk PCa rose from 14% to 28%. The proportion of men with T1c tumors increased from 36% to 71%, whereas the proportion of those with T2 tumors decreased from 39% to 20%. The proportion of men with PSA levels of 4-6 ng/mL rose from 24% to 38%, whereas the proportion of men with PSA levels of 8-10 ng/mL decreased from 24% to 15%.

The proportion of men with less than 25% positive prostate biopsy cores increased from 41% to 52% between 2003-2006 and 2007-2011.

Loading links....
You must be a registered member of Renal and Urology News to post a comment.

Sign Up for Free e-newsletters