AUA 2011 Meeting Coverage


Follow our archived coverage from the American Urological Association's 2011 Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., including our four sections below.



PCA3 May Help Predict Insignificant Prostate Cancer

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Prostate cancer gene 3 (PCA3) may be a valuable predictor of pathologically confirmed low volume disease and insignificant prostate cancer (PCa), according to a study presented at the 2011 annual meeting of the American Urological Association.

Underarm Testosterone Therapy Cleared

WASHINGTON, D.C.—The FDA has approved the first and only testosterone therapy applied to the underarm.

Primary Care Providers Ordering More PSA Tests

WASHINGTON, D.C.—The rate of office-based PSA testing by primary care providers (PCPs) in the United States doubled from 1997 to 2008, according to data presented at the American Urological Association 2011 annual meeting.

Abnormal DREs in Obese Men Predict Greater Risk of Prostate Cancer

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Obese men are less likely to have an abnormal digital rectal examination (DRE) than non-obese men, according to findings presented at the American Urological Association 2011 annual meeting.

Heavier Men Face Higher LUTS Risk

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Elderly men who are overweight or obese are at increased risk for developing lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), but those who engage in a relatively high level of physical activity or daily walking for exercise have a reduced risk, data show.

Severe Adverse BPH Outcomes Persist

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Severe adverse outcomes of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) persist despite widespread use of oral therapies, according to a study presented at the American Urological Association 2011 annual meeting.

Trigonal Injections of Botulinum Toxin Improve OAB Outcomes

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Trigonal intradetrusor injections of botulinum toxin-A (BTX-A) results in greater reduction in overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms compared with trigone-sparing BTX-A injections, Irish investigators reported at the American Urological Association 2011 annual meeting.

Statins May Reduce Stone Risk

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Statin use by hyperlipidemic patients may decrease the risk of urinary stone formation, according to study findings presented at the American Urological Association 2011 annual meeting.

Silodosin Found to Ease CP/CPPS Symptoms

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Silodosin may be an effective treatment for moderate or severe chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), researchers reported at the American Urological Association 2011 annual meeting.

Adjuvant Drugs May Aid Clearance of Some Stones

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Adjuvant use of tamsulosin or nifedipine after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) improves stone free rates in patients treated for non-lower pole renal stones 10-20 mm in diameter, Brazilian researchers reported at the American Urological Association 2011 annual meeting.

Overactive Bladder Often Associated with Pelvic Organ Prolapse

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Posterior compartment pelvic organ prolapse (POP) in women is often associated with overactive bladder (OAB), and POP surgery may help to decrease OAB symptoms as well as detrusor overactive (DO), according to study findings presented at the American Urological Association 2011 annual meeting.

Surrogate Markers May Identify Age-Associated Biochemical Changes in OAB patients

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Urinary nerve growth factor (NGF) and MCP-1 may be surrogate markers for monitoring age-associated biochemical changes in patients with overactive bladder (OAB), according to data presented at the American Urological Association 2011 annual meeting.

Intratumoral CRP May Predict Post-Op RCC Outcomes

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Intratumoral C-reactive protein (CRP) may be a robust biomarker of prognosis in patients with local renal cell carcinoma (RCC), investigators reported at the American Urological Association 2011 annual meeting.

Overweight Young Men Face High Risk of Enlarged Prostates

Overweight Young Men Face High Risk of Enlarged Prostates

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Overweight young men are more likely than normal-weight men to develop an enlarged prostate later in life, researchers reported.

Modest Weight Loss Does Not Prevent LUTS

Modest Weight Loss Does Not Prevent LUTS

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Although obesity has been linked with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in aging men, modest weight loss may not prevent onset or progression of LUTS in this population, new findings presented at the American Urological Association 2011 annual meeting suggest.

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